Intensive Outpatient Program (IOP)
at Square 1 Clinics

An LGBTQ+ Friendly & Transgender Safe Place

Your First Step to Recovery Starts at Square One

If you’re struggling with drug or alcohol dependency or are experiencing symptoms of substance or alcohol use disorder, you’re far from alone. 

Life is full of stressors that often seem to pile on all at once, which can lead to using alcohol or other substances as a coping mechanism. When you add on the stressors of the COVID-19 pandemic, inflation and the effects of a divided government, more and more Americans have turned to alcohol and other substances to cope with the stress – especially in Florida.

While it’s no secret we live in a beautiful “vacation” state that attracts visitors from around the world, living here isn’t exactly a vacation. The Sunshine State has been dealing with some of the highest rates of alcohol and substance use in the country. In fact, Florida reported a 57% increase in substance abuse during the summer of 2020, with alcohol leading the way, followed by marijuana, opioids, benzos, meth, cocaine, heroin/fentanyl and others. 

Drug overdose deaths also increased, which resulted in the highest number ever recorded in U.S. history at a total of 93,000, with Florida ranking 2nd in the nation. The greater Tampa Bay region alone, which has been hit particularly hard by the opioid crisis, recorded more than 1,200 opioid overdose deaths. Pinellas County reported a 35% increase in drug overdose deaths compared to 2019, while Pasco County saw a whopping 71% increase.

Without treatment, the continued use of alcohol and other substances can lead to the development of substance and/or alcohol use disorder, which can totally disrupt your life and cause other health conditions. Mental health and substance use disorders also tend to go hand-in-hand, which makes seeking treatment even more challenging. 

This is where Square 1 Clinics’ Intensive Outpatient Program (IOP) comes in. 

Unlike inpatient rehabilitation that involves being admitted to a facility for around-the-clock care, the Intensive Outpatient Program (IOP) is designed for those seeking alcohol and/or substance abuse or disorder treatment without completely interfering with everyday life.

A much more structured program compared to the other outpatient services offered at Square 1 Clinics, IOP requires meeting 3 to 4 times per week at 3 hours per session, with a minimum weekly commitment of 10 hours. The treatment focuses on individual therapy sessions, group meetings, family services, aftercare and recovery coaching.

The program also welcomes clients with co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders into treatment in an integrated fashion, addressing both the mental illness and the substance use disorder as chronic, relapsing conditions that require long-term support.

Contact us today to get started on your journey to recovery.

According to the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), Substance Use Disorder (SUD) is described as a “mental condition that affects a person’s brain and behavior, leading to the inability to control their use of substances, such as legal and illicit drugs, prescribed medications and alcohol”, which leads to clinically significant impairment.

As defined by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), clinically significant impairment includes health problems, disability and the failure to meet major responsibilities at work, school or home.

Those diagnosed with SUD have such an intense focus on using a certain substance, or combination of substances, that it impairs their ability to function in day-to-day life. They also continue using the substance(s), despite awareness of the harmful consequences. Symptoms of SUD can range from moderate to severe, with addiction being the most severe form.

Signs and Symptoms

Some of the signs and symptoms of SUD include:

  • Using a substance or combination of substances in larger amounts for longer than intended.

  • Developing a tolerance to the substance(s), resulting in the need to use more in one sitting in order to achieve the same effect.

  • The inability to stop using the substance(s), despite best efforts.

  • An increase in the amount of time spent obtaining, using and recovering from the substance(s).

  • Experiencing strong urges or cravings to use the substance(s).

  • Continued use of the substance(s) despite the interference with relationships and social activities.

  • Continued use the substance(s) despite the awareness of the psychological and physical problems it may cause.

  • Missing or giving up important work and social activities due to using the substance(s).

  • An increase in risk-taking related to using the substance.

  • The development of withdrawal symptoms when attempting to stop using the substance(s).

Co-occuring Mental Health Disorders

Research has also shown that about half of those diagnosed with SUD also experience a co-occuring mental disorder, and vice versa; however, one doesn’t necessarily cause the other.

There are a few possibilities that can explain why SUD and mental disorders may occur together, including:

  • Family history and environmental factors: Both types of disorders can run in families, which suggests genes may be a risk factor; while environmental factors such as stress or trauma may cause genetic changes that are passed down through generations, thus contributing to the development of either disorder.

  • Coping mechanisms: Research has also suggested that those diagnosed with a mental disorder may use substances to self-medicate, which may temporarily help some symptoms but can also worsen symptoms over time.

  • Changes in brain structure: The use of a substance or combination of substances may trigger changes in brain function and structure, which can increase the likelihood of developing a mental disorder.


Some of the most common co-occurring mental disorders include depression, bipolar disorder, anxiety disorders, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), schizophrenia and other personality disorders. Symptoms of SUD and mental health disorders also tend to overlap, which can make diagnosing for either a challenge.

For this reason, treating both disorders together is recommended, but only after a comprehensive evaluation has been conducted to diagnose each disorder separately. This helps reduce the chances of a missed diagnosis, while also ensuring the treatment plan is targeted to the client’s needs.

Treatment Options

Treatment for SUD may include the combination of therapy and medications; however, Square 1 Clinics focuses on behavioral therapies, including:

  • Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT): A method proven to be just as or even more effective than prescription medications, CBT involves identifying thought patterns and how they affect emotions and behaviors, and learning how to cope with difficult situations by challenging irrational thoughts and changing behaviors.

  • Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT): Another type of cognitive behavioral therapy, DBT focuses on learning how to “live in the moment” by developing skills in mindfulness, distress tolerance, emotion regulation, and interpersonal effectiveness in balancing priorities and maintaining relationships.

  • Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT): This method combines cognitive behavioral therapy with meditative practices and mindfulness to help clients find relief from feelings of distress by better understanding and managing their thoughts and emotions.

  • Solution-Focused Therapy (SFT): Also referred to as Solution-Focused Brief Therapy, SFT is a short-term, goal-focused therapeutic approach that focuses on present and future circumstances, rather than past experiences. Treatment involves incorporating positive psychology practices that help achieve desired change by constructing solutions, rather than focusing on problems.

  • Person Centered Therapy: A client-focused approach that facilitates self-discovery and self-acceptance to provide a means toward healing and positive growth. Treatment involves clients taking the lead in therapy discussions to help them discover their own solutions. In this setting, the therapist serves as a guide by providing encouragement and support without interrupting or interfering with the self-discovery process.

  • Motivational Interviewing: A short-term, collaborative form of communication therapy designed to empower individuals in facilitating the desired changes identified through the process. This type of therapy helps clients find the motivation needed to change behaviors preventing them from making healthier choices.

If substance use is taking over your life, contact us today to take your first step to recovery.

While Substance Use Disorder also encompasses alcohol use, there is a more specific disorder relating to alcohol misuse, abuse and dependence.

According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD) is defined as “a medical condition characterized by an impaired ability to stop or control alcohol use despite adverse social, occupational, or health consequences”. 

Used as an umbrella term for alcohol abuse, alcohol dependence, alcohol addiction and alcoholism, AUD is considered a brain disorder with three levels of severity: mild, moderate and severe. The severity is determined by the number of criteria a person meets based on an assessment of their symptoms using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5).


Signs and Symptoms

When being assessed for AUD, you may be asked if you’ve experienced any of the following in the past year:

  • Have there been times when you ended up drinking more or for longer than you intended?

  • Have you tried or wanted to cut down or stop drinking but couldn’t?

  • Have you spent a lot of time drinking, being sick from drinking or getting over other after-effects?

  • Have you wanted a drink so badly that you couldn’t think of anything else?

  • Have you found that drinking or being sick from drinking has often interfered with your work, school or family life?

  • Have you continued to drink, despite problems it has caused with your family or friends?

  • Have you given up or cut back on activities that were important or you enjoyed in order to drink instead?

  • Have you, on more than one occasion, found yourself in situations during or after drinking that increased your chances of getting hurt, such as driving, swimming, operating heavy machinery, walking in a dangerous area, or having unprotected sex?

  • Have you continued to drink even though it makes you feel depressed or anxious, or has added to another health problem?

  • Have you continued to drink despite having memory blackouts?

  • Have you had to consume much more alcohol than you used to in order to get the effect you want?
     
  • Have you experienced any withdrawal symptoms from the effects of alcohol wearing off, such as restlessness, trouble sleeping, tremors or shaking, nausea, sweating, a racing heart, or a seizure?


Risk Factors

The risks of developing alcohol use disorder depend on several factors, including how much, how often and quickly you consume alcohol. For example, binge drinking and heavy alcohol use, which are categorized as alcohol misuse, can increase the risk of developing AUD over time. 

Binge drinking refers to a pattern of drinking that involves consuming five or more drinks for men and 4 or more drinks for women during a two-hour period. Heavy alcohol use refers to a pattern of alcohol use that involves consuming more than four drinks in a day for men or more than three drinks for women.

According to NIAAA, other factors that can increase the risk of developing AUD include:

  • Drinking alcohol at an early age, with females at an increased risk.

  • Genetics and family history of alcohol use, with the risk being influenced by the intersection of genes and environment.

  • Mental health conditions and a history of trauma, which are often co-occurring disorders with AUD.

If alcohol use is taking over your life, contact us today to take your first step to recovery.

To determine if the program is right for you, our treatment team will conduct assessments to review the types of symptoms you’re experiencing and how they’re impacting your daily life. We’ll also review both your physical and psychological history to ensure you receive the proper levels of care. 

Upon admission to the program, you’ll receive an individualized treatment plan and schedule that has been tailored to your specific goals and needs.

Contact us today to take your first step toward recovery.

IOP for alcohol and substance abuse treatment in FloridaIf you’re struggling with drug or alcohol dependency or are experiencing symptoms of substance or alcohol use disorder, you’re far from alone. 

Life is full of stressors that often seem to pile on all at once, which can lead to using alcohol or other substances as a coping mechanism. When you add on the stressors of the COVID-19 pandemic, inflation and the effects of a divided government, more and more Americans have turned to alcohol and other substances to cope with the stress – especially in Florida.

While it’s no secret we live in a beautiful “vacation” state that attracts visitors from around the world, living here isn’t exactly a vacation. The Sunshine State has been dealing with some of the highest rates of alcohol and substance use in the country. In fact, Florida reported a 57% increase in substance abuse during the summer of 2020, with alcohol leading the way, followed by marijuana, opioids, benzos, meth, cocaine, heroin/fentanyl and others. 

Drug overdose deaths also increased, which resulted in the highest number ever recorded in U.S. history at a total of 93,000, with Florida ranking 2nd in the nation. The greater Tampa Bay region alone, which has been hit particularly hard by the opioid crisis, recorded more than 1,200 opioid overdose deaths. Pinellas County reported a 35% increase in drug overdose deaths compared to 2019, while Pasco County saw a whopping 71% increase.

Without treatment, the continued use of alcohol and other substances can lead to the development of substance and/or alcohol use disorder, which can totally disrupt your life and cause other health conditions. Mental health and substance use disorders also tend to go hand-in-hand, which makes seeking treatment even more challenging. 

This is where Square 1 Clinics’ Intensive Outpatient Program (IOP) comes in. 

Unlike inpatient rehabilitation that involves being admitted to a facility for around-the-clock care, the Intensive Outpatient Program (IOP) is designed for those seeking alcohol and/or substance abuse or disorder treatment without completely interfering with everyday life.

A much more structured program compared to the other outpatient services offered at Square 1 Clinics, IOP requires meeting 3 to 4 times per week at 3 hours per session, with a minimum weekly commitment of 10 hours. The treatment focuses on individual therapy sessions, group meetings, family services, aftercare and recovery coaching.

The program also welcomes clients with co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders into treatment in an integrated fashion, addressing both the mental illness and the substance use disorder as chronic, relapsing conditions that require long-term support.

Contact us today to get started on your journey to recovery.

According to the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), Substance Use Disorder (SUD) is described as a “mental condition that affects a person’s brain and behavior, leading to the inability to control their use of substances, such as legal and illicit drugs, prescribed medications and alcohol”, which leads to clinically significant impairment.

As defined by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), clinically significant impairment includes health problems, disability and the failure to meet major responsibilities at work, school or home.

Those diagnosed with SUD have such an intense focus on using a certain substance, or combination of substances, that it impairs their ability to function in day-to-day life. They also continue using the substance(s), despite awareness of the harmful consequences. Symptoms of SUD can range from moderate to severe, with addiction being the most severe form.

 

Signs and Symptoms

Some of the signs and symptoms of SUD include:

  • Using a substance or combination of substances in larger amounts for longer than intended.

     

  • Developing a tolerance to the substance(s), resulting in the need to use more in one sitting in order to achieve the same effect.

     

  • The inability to stop using the substance(s), despite best efforts.

     

  • An increase in the amount of time spent obtaining, using and recovering from the substance(s).

     

  • Experiencing strong urges or cravings to use the substance(s).

     

  • Continued use of the substance(s) despite the interference with relationships and social activities.

     

  • Continued use the substance(s) despite the awareness of the psychological and physical problems it may cause.

     

  • Missing or giving up important work and social activities due to using the substance(s).

     

  • An increase in risk-taking related to using the substance.

     

  • The development of withdrawal symptoms when attempting to stop using the substance(s).

Co-occuring Mental Health Disorders

Research has also shown that about half of those diagnosed with SUD also experience a co-occuring mental disorder, and vice versa; however, one doesn’t necessarily cause the other.

There are a few possibilities that can explain why SUD and mental disorders may occur together, including:

  • Family history and environmental factors: Both types of disorders can run in families, which suggests genes may be a risk factor; while environmental factors such as stress or trauma may cause genetic changes that are passed down through generations, thus contributing to the development of either disorder.

     

  • Coping mechanisms: Research has also suggested that those diagnosed with a mental disorder may use substances to self-medicate, which may temporarily help some symptoms but can also worsen symptoms over time.

     

  • Changes in brain structure: The use of a substance or combination of substances may trigger changes in brain function and structure, which can increase the likelihood of developing a mental disorder.

Some of the most common co-occurring mental disorders include depression, bipolar disorder, anxiety disorders, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), schizophrenia and other personality disorders. Symptoms of SUD and mental health disorders also tend to overlap, which can make diagnosing for either a challenge.

For this reason, treating both disorders together is recommended, but only after a comprehensive evaluation has been conducted to diagnose each disorder separately. This helps reduce the chances of a missed diagnosis, while also ensuring the treatment plan is targeted to the client’s needs.

Treatment Options

Treatment for SUD may include the combination of therapy and medications; however, Square 1 Clinics focuses on behavioral therapies, including:

  • Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT): A method proven to be just as or even more effective than prescription medications, CBT involves identifying thought patterns and how they affect emotions and behaviors, and learning how to cope with difficult situations by challenging irrational thoughts and changing behaviors.

     

  • Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT): Another type of cognitive behavioral therapy, DBT focuses on learning how to “live in the moment” by developing skills in mindfulness, distress tolerance, emotion regulation, and interpersonal effectiveness in balancing priorities and maintaining relationships.

     

  • Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT): This method combines cognitive behavioral therapy with meditative practices and mindfulness to help clients find relief from feelings of distress by better understanding and managing their thoughts and emotions.

     

  • Solution-Focused Therapy (SFT): Also referred to as Solution-Focused Brief Therapy, SFT is a short-term, goal-focused therapeutic approach that focuses on present and future circumstances, rather than past experiences. Treatment involves incorporating positive psychology practices that help achieve desired change by constructing solutions, rather than focusing on problems.

     

  • Person Centered Therapy: A client-focused approach that facilitates self-discovery and self-acceptance to provide a means toward healing and positive growth. Treatment involves clients taking the lead in therapy discussions to help them discover their own solutions. In this setting, the therapist serves as a guide by providing encouragement and support without interrupting or interfering with the self-discovery process.

     

  • Motivational Interviewing: A short-term, collaborative form of communication therapy designed to empower individuals in facilitating the desired changes identified through the process. This type of therapy helps clients find the motivation needed to change behaviors preventing them from making healthier choices.

If substance use is taking over your life, contact us today to take your first step to recovery.

While Substance Use Disorder also encompasses alcohol use, there is a more specific disorder relating to alcohol misuse, abuse and dependence.

According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD) is defined as “a medical condition characterized by an impaired ability to stop or control alcohol use despite adverse social, occupational, or health consequences”. 

Used as an umbrella term for alcohol abuse, alcohol dependence, alcohol addiction and alcoholism, AUD is considered a brain disorder with three levels of severity: mild, moderate and severe. The severity is determined by the number of criteria a person meets based on an assessment of their symptoms using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5).

 

Signs and Symptoms

When being assessed for AUD, you may be asked if you’ve experienced any of the following in the past year:

  • Have there been times when you ended up drinking more or for longer than you intended?

     

     

  • Have you tried or wanted to cut down or stop drinking but couldn’t?

     

     

  • Have you spent a lot of time drinking, being sick from drinking or getting over other after-effects?

     

     

  • Have you wanted a drink so badly that you couldn’t think of anything else?

     

     

  • Have you found that drinking or being sick from drinking has often interfered with your work, school or family life?

     

     

  • Have you continued to drink, despite problems it has caused with your family or friends?

     

     

  • Have you given up or cut back on activities that were important or you enjoyed in order to drink instead?

     

     

  • Have you, on more than one occasion, found yourself in situations during or after drinking that increased your chances of getting hurt, such as driving, swimming, operating heavy machinery, walking in a dangerous area, or having unprotected sex?

     

     

  • Have you continued to drink even though it makes you feel depressed or anxious, or has added to another health problem?

     

     

  • Have you continued to drink despite having memory blackouts?

     

     

  • Have you had to consume much more alcohol than you used to in order to get the effect you want?

     

     

  • Have you experienced any withdrawal symptoms from the effects of alcohol wearing off, such as restlessness, trouble sleeping, tremors or shaking, nausea, sweating, a racing heart, or a seizure?

     

     

Risk Factors

The risks of developing alcohol use disorder depend on several factors, including how much, how often and quickly you consume alcohol. For example, binge drinking and heavy alcohol use, which are categorized as alcohol misuse, can increase the risk of developing AUD over time. 

Binge drinking refers to a pattern of drinking that involves consuming five or more drinks for men and 4 or more drinks for women during a two-hour period. Heavy alcohol use refers to a pattern of alcohol use that involves consuming more than four drinks in a day for men or more than three drinks for women.

According to NIAAA, other factors that can increase the risk of developing AUD include:

  • Drinking alcohol at an early age, with females at an increased risk.

     

     

  • Genetics and family history of alcohol use, with the risk being influenced by the intersection of genes and environment.

     

     

  • Mental health conditions and a history of trauma, which are often co-occurring disorders with AUD.

     

     

If alcohol use is taking over your life, contact us today to take your first step to recovery.

To determine if the program is right for you, our treatment team will conduct assessments to review the types of symptoms you’re experiencing and how they’re impacting your daily life. We’ll also review both your physical and psychological history to ensure you receive the proper levels of care. 

Upon admission to the program, you’ll receive an individualized treatment plan and schedule that has been tailored to your specific goals and needs.

Contact us today to take your first step toward recovery.

If you’re struggling with drug or alcohol dependency or are experiencing symptoms of substance or alcohol use disorder, you’re far from alone. 

Life is full of stressors that often seem to pile on all at once, which can lead to using alcohol or other substances as a coping mechanism. 

When you add on the stressors of the COVID-19 pandemic, inflation and the effects of a divided government, more and more Americans have turned to alcohol and other substances to cope with the stress – especially in Florida.

While it’s no secret we live in a beautiful “vacation” state that attracts visitors from around the world, living here isn’t exactly a vacation. 

The Sunshine State has been dealing with some of the highest rates of alcohol and substance use in the country. In fact, Florida reported a 57% increase in substance abuse during the summer of 2020, with alcohol leading the way, followed by marijuana, opioids, benzos, meth, cocaine, heroin/fentanyl and others. 

Drug overdose deaths also increased, which resulted in the highest number ever recorded in U.S. history at a total of 93,000, with Florida ranking 2nd in the nation. 

The greater Tampa Bay region alone, which has been hit particularly hard by the opioid crisis, recorded more than 1,200 opioid overdose deaths. Pinellas County reported a 35% increase in drug overdose deaths compared to 2019, while Pasco County saw a whopping 71% increase.

Without treatment, the continued use of alcohol and other substances can lead to the development of substance and/or alcohol use disorder, which can totally disrupt your life and cause other health conditions. 

Mental health and substance use disorders also tend to go hand-in-hand, which makes seeking treatment even more challenging. 

This is where the Intensive Outpatient Program (IOP) at Square 1 Clinics comes in. 

Unlike inpatient rehabilitation that involves being admitted to a facility for around-the-clock care, the Intensive Outpatient Program (IOP) is designed for those seeking alcohol and/or substance abuse or disorder treatment without completely interfering with everyday life.

A much more structured program compared to the other outpatient services offered at Square 1 Clinics, IOP requires meeting 3 to 4 times per week at 3 hours per session, with a minimum weekly commitment of 10 hours. The treatment focuses on individual therapy sessions, group meetings, family services, aftercare and recovery coaching.

The program also welcomes clients with co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders into treatment in an integrated fashion, addressing both the mental illness and the substance use disorder as chronic, relapsing conditions that require long-term support.

Contact us today to get started on your journey to recovery.

According to the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), Substance Use Disorder (SUD) is described as a “mental condition that affects a person’s brain and behavior, leading to the inability to control their use of substances, such as legal and illicit drugs, prescribed medications and alcohol”, which leads to clinically significant impairment.

As defined by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), clinically significant impairment includes health problems, disability and failure to meet responsibilities at work, school or home.

Those diagnosed with SUD have such an intense focus on using a certain substance, or combination of substances, that it impairs their ability to function in day-to-day life. They also continue using the substance(s), despite awareness of the harmful consequences. Symptoms of SUD can range from moderate to severe, with addiction being the most severe form.

 

Signs and Symptoms

Some of the signs and symptoms of SUD include:

  • Using a substance or combination of substances in larger amounts for longer than intended.

     

  • Developing a tolerance to the substance(s), resulting in the need to use more in one sitting in order to achieve the same effect.

     

  • The inability to stop using the substance(s), despite best efforts.

     

  • An increase in the amount of time spent obtaining, using and recovering from the substance(s).

     

  • Experiencing strong urges or cravings to use the substance(s).

     

  • Continued use of the substance(s) despite the interference with relationships and social activities.

     

  • Continued use the substance(s) despite the awareness of the psychological and physical problems it may cause.

     

  • Missing or giving up important work and social activities due to using the substance(s).

     

  • An increase in risk-taking related to using the substance.

     

  • The development of withdrawal symptoms when attempting to stop using the substance(s).

     

Co-occuring Mental Health Disorders

Research has also shown that about half of those diagnosed with SUD also experience a co-occuring mental disorder, and vice versa; however, one doesn’t necessarily cause the other.

There are a few possibilities that can explain why SUD and mental disorders may occur together, including:

  • Family history and environmental factors: Both types of disorders can run in families, which suggests genes may be a risk factor; while environmental factors such as stress or trauma may cause genetic changes that are passed down through generations, thus contributing to the development of either disorder.

     

  • Coping mechanisms: Research has also suggested that those diagnosed with a mental disorder may use substances to self-medicate, which may temporarily help some symptoms but can also worsen symptoms over time.

     

  • Changes in brain structure: The use of a substance or combination of substances may trigger changes in brain function and structure, which can increase the likelihood of developing a mental disorder.


Some of the most common co-occurring mental disorders include depression, bipolar disorder, anxiety disorders, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), schizophrenia and other personality disorders. Symptoms of SUD and mental health disorders also tend to overlap, which can make diagnosing for either a challenge.

For this reason, treating both disorders together is recommended, but only after a comprehensive evaluation has been conducted to diagnose each disorder separately. This helps reduce the chances of a missed diagnosis, while also ensuring the treatment plan is targeted to the client’s needs.

 

Treatment Options

Treatment for SUD may include the combination of therapy and medications; however, Square 1 Clinics focuses on behavioral therapies, including:

  • Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT): A method proven to be just as or even more effective than prescription medications, CBT involves identifying thought patterns and how they affect emotions and behaviors, and learning how to cope with difficult situations by challenging irrational thoughts and changing behaviors.

     

  • Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT): Another type of cognitive behavioral therapy, DBT focuses on learning how to “live in the moment” by developing skills in mindfulness, distress tolerance, emotion regulation, and interpersonal effectiveness in balancing priorities and maintaining relationships.

     

  • Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT): This method combines cognitive behavioral therapy with meditative practices and mindfulness to help clients find relief from feelings of distress by better understanding and managing their thoughts and emotions.

     

  • Solution-Focused Therapy (SFT): Also referred to as Solution-Focused Brief Therapy, SFT is a short-term, goal-focused therapeutic approach that focuses on present and future circumstances, rather than past experiences. Treatment involves incorporating positive psychology practices that help achieve desired change by constructing solutions, rather than focusing on problems.

     

  • Person Centered Therapy: A client-focused approach that facilitates self-discovery and self-acceptance to provide a means toward healing and positive growth. Treatment involves clients taking the lead in therapy discussions to help them discover their own solutions. In this setting, the therapist serves as a guide by providing encouragement and support without interrupting or interfering with the self-discovery process.

     

  • Motivational Interviewing: A short-term, collaborative form of communication therapy designed to empower individuals in facilitating the desired changes identified through the process. This type of therapy helps clients find the motivation needed to change behaviors preventing them from making healthier choices.


If substance use is taking over your life, contact us today to take your first step to recovery.

While Substance Use Disorder also encompasses alcohol use, there is a more specific disorder relating to alcohol misuse, abuse and dependence.

According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD) is defined as “a medical condition characterized by an impaired ability to stop or control alcohol use despite adverse social, occupational, or health consequences”. 

Used as an umbrella term for alcohol abuse, alcohol dependence, alcohol addiction and alcoholism, AUD is considered a brain disorder with three levels of severity: mild, moderate and severe. The severity is determined by the number of criteria a person meets based on an assessment of their symptoms using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5).

 

Signs and Symptoms

When being assessed for AUD, you may be asked if you’ve experienced any of the following in the past year:

  • Have there been times when you ended up drinking more or for longer than you intended?

     

  • Have you tried or wanted to cut down or stop drinking but couldn’t?

     

  • Have you spent a lot of time drinking, being sick from drinking or getting over other after-effects?

     

  • Have you wanted a drink so badly that you couldn’t think of anything else?

     

  • Have you found that drinking or being sick from drinking has often interfered with your work, school or family life?

     

  • Have you continued to drink, despite problems it has caused with your family or friends?

     

  • Have you given up or cut back on activities that were important or you enjoyed in order to drink instead?

     

  • Have you, on more than one occasion, found yourself in situations during or after drinking that increased your chances of getting hurt, such as driving, swimming, operating heavy machinery, walking in a dangerous area, or having unprotected sex?

     

  • Have you continued to drink even though it makes you feel depressed or anxious, or has added to another health problem?

     

  • Have you continued to drink despite having memory blackouts?

     

  • Have you had to consume much more alcohol than you used to in order to get the effect you want?

     

  • Have you experienced any withdrawal symptoms from the effects of alcohol wearing off, such as restlessness, trouble sleeping, tremors or shaking, nausea, sweating, a racing heart, or a seizure?

     

Risk Factors

The risks of developing alcohol use disorder depend on several factors, including how much, how often and quickly you consume alcohol. For example, binge drinking and heavy alcohol use, which are categorized as alcohol misuse, can increase the risk of developing AUD over time. 

Binge drinking refers to a pattern of drinking that involves consuming five or more drinks for men and 4 or more drinks for women during a two-hour period. Heavy alcohol use refers to a pattern of alcohol use that involves consuming more than four drinks in a day for men or more than three drinks for women.

According to NIAAA, other factors that can increase the risk of developing AUD include:

  • Drinking alcohol at an early age, with females at an increased risk.
  • Genetics and family history of alcohol use, with the risk being influenced by the intersection of genes and environment.
  • Mental health conditions and a history of trauma, which are often co-occurring disorders with AUD.

If alcohol use is taking over your life, contact us today to take your first step to recovery.

To determine if the program is right for you, our treatment team will conduct assessments to review the types of symptoms you’re experiencing and how they’re impacting your daily life. We’ll also review both your physical and psychological history to ensure you receive the proper levels of care. 

Upon admission to the program, you’ll receive an individualized treatment plan and schedule that has been tailored to your specific goals and needs.

Contact us today to take your first step toward recovery.

Locations Served

In-Person Therapy

Sqare 1 Clinics is conveniently located in Pinellas County, Florida, within driving distance from Clearwater, Oldsmar, Safety Harbor, Tarpon Springs and other surrounding Tampa Bay locations.
Individual Therapy Services at Square 1 Clinics, Palm Harbor, FL
Online Telehealth Therapy Services at Square 1 Clinics, Palm Harbor, FL

Online Therapy

Available to clients across the entire state of Florida, we also offer convenient and confidential telehealth therapy for all mental health and substance abuse counseling services available at Square 1 Clinics.